Two Calls for Papers

May 3, 2011

This symposium looks amazing. I wish I could attend!

More info: http://www.sit.edu/symposium

Scholars working in the fields of memory studies, peace and conflict studies, human rights, and post-conflict are invited to attend an interdisciplinary symposium on Conflict, Memory, and Reconciliation. This symposium will provide a forum for academic exchange, dialogue, debate, and public engagement on topics that are critical to the future of the world.

Come to Kigali, Rwanda to present your work, share your research, and generate knowledge in the fields of memory, reconciliation, and conflict transformation. The Symposium is hosted by SIT, January 10 – 13, 2012.

Call for Proposals: Scholars and practitioners in the fields of memory, reconciliation, and conflict transformation are invited to submit proposals for sessions on themes included but not limited to the following:

  • Collective, public, social and shared memory
  • The ethics of remembering and forgetting
  • Commemoration and remembrance
  • Genocide memory
  • Cultural memory and heritage
  • Oral history and the culture of the witness
  • Memory and the politics of identity
  • Politics of memory and denial
  • Civil society and dealing with shared violent pasts
  • Ethics and pedagogy of teaching memory

We welcome additional topics from a variety of case studies of conflict and post-conflict societies, dealing with shared violent pasts. Please be creative and collaborative. Panels can be on a specific theme or case study discussed. The objective is to explore together the meeting points of memory studies and of post conflict, peacebuilding, and reconciliation studies and generate knowledge about the pedagogy and ethics in teaching post-conflict in a study abroad setting.

Submission guidelines:

Abstracts should be sent by June 1, 2011 to Robin Bitters, Director of Institutional Projects via symposium@sit.edu Please include your name, college or university affiliation, address, email, and phone. As noted above, abstracts should not exceed 350 words and include the main argument, the material used, and disciplinary discussions involved.

————–

And another great conference is being organized by the University of London Institute of Paris:

Building Reconciliation and Social Cohesion through Indigenous Festival Performances, Interdisciplinary Symposium, University of London Institute of Paris, November 17-18, 2011

This symposium seeks to explore contemporary indigenous performances as transformative strategies and praxes aimed at enhancing social cohesion. It focuses specifically on the role of festival performances in advancing reconciliation efforts and investigates how such events contribute to reimagining communities and rebuilding trust. With reference to the philosophical, historical and religious roots of reconciliation, the symposium will look at the tensions and affects involved in performances that engage with (hi)stories of colonialism and contemporary formations of injustice.
We also seek to probe the conditions that enable festival arts to flourish in their own contexts and to be taken from local to national and transnational forums. The role, and limits, of festivals as resonant interfaces where emancipative strategies, wellbeing, creativity and indigenous cultural capital are promoted will be of particular interest here. Responding to current debates on the question of reconciliation and social justice, the symposium hopes to provide comparisons of various artistic, community-driven, cross-cultural and trans-‐local initiatives.
Deadline for Abstracts: May 21, 2011 – Email Estelle.castro.rhul.uk
More info here.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: